Have you ever heard silence?

“Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and right doing there is a field. I’ll meet you there. When the soul lies down in that grass the world is too full to talk about.”
― Rumi said.

“Have you ever heard the wonderful silence just before the dawn?
Or the quiet and calm just as a storm ends?
Or perhaps you know the silence when you haven’t the answer to a question you’ve been asked,
Or the hush of a country road at night,
Or the expectant pause of a room full of people when someone is just about to speak,
Or, most beautiful of all, the moment after the door closes and you’re alone in the whole house?

Each one is different, you know, and all very beautiful if you listen carefully.”

Lately I’ve begun to realize that one can listen to silence and learn from it. It has a quality and a dimension of it’s own.
When words are empty, equations doesn’t matter anymore. But it’s always difficult to keep shut or use the right amount of words.

  • First theory.

    The biggest challenge after success is shutting up about it. There are two secrets to success, one choose your words wisely, second I won’t tell you. Successful people tend to speak the right amount of words required, for only people intelligent enough can identify what’s relevant to be said and what’s not. Giving more information is not only harmful but might communicate a wrong idea.

    Say, if I’m chatting too much with my boss, he might think I’m interested in him beyond work. Or a cheesy salesperson may blabber out too much information, in a way nagging out the customer.

    Also in relationships, it’s important to understand the other person’s silence more than only words. Sometimes, in the middle of a disagreement with her husband or to avoid one, she’ll call time out. If she don’t pause long enough for a walk or a sitting meditation to reflect on what’s really going on, she’s likely to keep blundering with hurtful speech. In silence one has a chance to cool down, assess the situation, examine one’s own motivations, and consider what words will help heal the rift.

  • Second Theory.

    Speech pauses are the finest tricks of oratory since time immemorial. And the If you do it right, nobody is conscious of your pauses, but your ideas are more persuasively delivered. As white spaces add breathe to a paper full of words, speech pauses are necessary for verbal communication.

    For example:

    We were married ten years ago [pause] I still remember my first look at her coming up the aisle.Speech pause is an excellent way of delivering emotions. Isn’t it?

  • There’s another theory.

    Would you find it uncomfortable to go on a date and sit in silence for an hour because you had only recently met your companion? What would you think if after returning home from several months’ absence your parents and relative didn’t speak to you for several days? Can you imagine working on a four-person cattle crew for several days without being introduced to or speaking with one of the other members, who you did not know?

    Although these situations seem unusual to us, they are considered appropriate among the Apache. Although it seems natural to us that when people first meet introductions are in order and that when friends and relative reunite greeting and catching up will immediately follow, this is not the case for all cultures. There’s a study which investigates certain aspects of silence in the culture of the Western Apache of east-central Arizona.It is not the case that a man who is silent says nothing. – the Apache culture believes.

  • Finally I’d like to highlight the importance silence holds, spiritually. Silence soothes the harried soul.

    Maybe because I can talk up a storm, I love, even crave, silence. I feel safe in it. I know I won’t blurt out something foolish or harmful, something I’ll be sorry for. She said.

    It is in the womb of silence that we can grow ideas for the best course of action to take. They say it helps us use our personal resources judiciously. Talking expends energy and takes up time. One requires to identify inner knowledge one has, rather than looking for places to go for. The way in is through inside.


You can surely fool people by your words, but not by your silence. In fact, silent is one’s loudest cry.

IT’S TIME TO GIVE UP WORDS AND HEAR SILENCE.

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India’s trouble mantra: It’s complacency with mediocrity

A silly young cricket, accustomed to sing
Through the warm, sunny months of gay summer and spring,
Began to complain when he found that, at home,
His cupboard was empty, and winter had come.

Corruption. Pollution. Unemployment. Illiteracy. Women Empowerment.
No. The biggest trouble India’s facing is the deep rooted mediocrity among her people.

People have a chalta h attitude, which means let it be, whatever’s happening, let it happen.
We are a country with a glorious past. Our battle for freedom proves the inherent never giving up attitude with our souls.

We were like ants:
1. Not intimidated by the sheer size of the objects that they need to carry
2. Value Teamwork, they help each other making it possible for them to achieve their goals
3. Organized in how they carry out their tasks that they are able to accomplish it no matter how big the task is
4. Having your reserves-up to cope with unforeseen things

But things have changed.

Non-performing citizens, our governance system is paralyzed. People have lost the required motivation to carry forward the legacy of our glorious past.  As this culture of mediocrity has perpetuated meticulously by the socio-political-cultural systems, it has deeply percolated into the psyche of an average Indian. Not only that, we all configure the major trouble is the missing elements of “excellence and self- discipline/regulation” in socio-cultural spheres of India. The common man has become the symbol of bad self- discipline and non-performance.

Today’s youth and it’s false ambitions, the verbal fluency of our intellectuals, and the fickle-mindedness of our politicians- all this leave little but a gnawing incompleteness in the frequency of the oscillation of our nation. The mindless demonstrations by youth and it’s representatives and the personal opinion of the common man: all are critical of the present malfunctioning system of governance and shout for collective desire for change.

In the bleached atmosphere of the new century, it is hard to tear apart the mediocrity from the fabric of our nation, the equation hardly matters. What matters is that it’s people are believers, and they expect life to change. Something good is bound to rise from ashes. Far away in the rumbling foundation, a seed of hope is silently spreading it’s roots and the sirens will soon sing the melody of a coming transformation.

In a small town, a village teacher is giving lessons to the future torch bearers of our nation, the little hope, though faint, gives hope for a remake. The fruit of the tamped earth must rise and bring back the zeal to get over with our complacency with mediocrity.